Monday, April 9, 2012

Commemorating the Bataan Death March, Seventy Years On

Seventy years ago today marks the start of the famed Bataan Death March of World War II.

The Bataan* Death March began as a plea for life. Men were tired, weak, and lacking food. The 70-mile march from Mariveles (on the tip of Bataan) to San Fernando was a trial that tested a man, broke him, or got him killed. The famished men who made the exhausting march in World War II would never be forgotten.

Read the rest here. A grateful h/t to Kevin R.  for sending me the heads-up.


American captives on Bataan.



7 comments:

Anonymous said...

God bless them.

CI-Roller Dude said...

Several years ago I was asked to go on one of those hikes to honor those who died. We had a few brand new 2nd LTs...and I told them: "so which ones of you is going to die on this death march?"

Susan Katz Keating said...

The re-enactments are tough enough - I cannot imagine enduring the real thing. Such amazing spirits they had.

MDR said...

got a friend who's participating in a re-enactment. he's hurtin.

Susan Katz Keating said...

One of the families we knew from gymnastics is descended from a Bataan march survivor. He went back with a group of his fellows maybe 10 years ago. One of his daughters wrote a book about his experiences - I will have to look them up and see if he ever published the book.

BillT said...

Dirty Little Secret: Most of the troops on Bataan and Corregidor were National Guardsmen who'd been activated while the Army was bringing the first crop of draftees up to par. North Carolina lost its entire Guard complement.

Susan Katz Keating said...

That's the first time I heard that about those guys being NG, or about the North Carolina Guard. Wow....